The Best Peanut Brittle Recipe

Peanut Brittle is a classic buttery and crunchy candy that no one will be able to resist munching on. It’s perfect for packaging and giving away during the holidays.

We also love making Homemade Toffee, Slow Cooker Cinnamon Almonds, Microwave Caramels, and Reese’s Fudge.  They make the perfect neighbor gifts!

peanut brittle in a sheet pan

Peanut Brittle Recipe

Hey there! Melanie here again from Garnish & Glaze and today I’m sharing one of my very favorite candies– Peanut Brittle. For as long as I can remember, my grandmother always had peanut brittle in a dish hanging around at her house. It wasn’t homemade but it was the best there was- See’s Candies. I could eat my weight in that stuff and the same is true for this homemade Peanut Brittle. Practically a fourth of this was gone by the end of the photo shoot.

I love making Homemade Caramels but for some reason was always a little fearful of making brittle. Come to find out, Peanut Brittle is actually quite similar to making caramel, you just cook it to a higher temperature.

As I researched recipes to create the very best peanut brittle, I found that most of them only used a couple tablespoons of butter. From my many years of munching on See’s Candies Peanut Brittle, I knew I’d need more than that. This brittle is perfectly smooth, buttery, and crunchy. Just what peanut brittle should be.

What are the ingredients for peanut brittle?

  • sugar
  • karo syrup
  • water
  • butter
  • roasted peanuts
  • baking soda
  • vanilla

How do you make Homemade Peanut Brittle?

  • Line a 10×15 inch baking pan with parchment paper and set aside.  Place sugar, syrup, and water in a 2 quart with candy thermometer attached and bring to a boil over medium heat. Slowly stir in the butter a little at a time. Let mixture boil, stirring occasionally.
  • When mixture reaches 250 degrees (when you drop a little of it into cold water it forms pliable strands), add the peanuts. Stir constantly for 7-10 more minutes until mixture reaches 300 degrees (when dropped in water it forms brittle strands). Immediately remove from heat, add the vanilla and baking soda, and stir until evenly combined. Pour onto parchment lined baking sheet and spread evenly.
  • Let cool and set. Use a mallet or back of a spoon to crack the brittle into pieces.

peanut brittle in a jar

Can you pour peanut brittle on parchment paper?

You can pour the mixture onto a parchment lined baking sheet.  A granite or marble slab will also work as well.

Can you put peanut brittle in the fridge?

Store the peanut brittle at room temperature, not in the fridge.  It can be stored for up to two weeks.

 

peanut brittle stacked on top of each other

Now, the key ingredient in brittle that makes it so you don’t crack your tooth is the baking soda that creates little air bubbles. It’s so cool to see the caramel become all foamy when you stir it in.

Once the brittle cools and hardens, you break it into pieces by hitting it with a meat mallet or the back of a spoon. I like to hold the brittle up at and angle and then give it a good wack. You get pieces of all shapes and sizes. I prefer smaller pieces (with lots of peanuts) so I can pop it all in my mouth at once. Enjoy!

 

peanut brittle

Watch a video on how to make peanut brittle here:

 

Peanut Brittle

5 from 3 votes
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Author Melanie Dueck
Servings 12

Fantasy Fudge is the creamiest, dreamiest most delicious classic fudge recipe.  The fudge just melts in your mouth and is so easy to make with no thermometer required!

Course Appetizer, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine American
Keyword peanut brittle, peanut brittle recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup white Karo syrup
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/2 cup butter cubed
  • 1 1/2 cups unsalted roasted peanuts
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

Instructions

  1. Line a 10x15 inch baking pan with parchment paper and set aside.
  2. Place sugar, syrup, and water in a 2 quart with candy thermometer attached and bring to a boil over medium heat. Slowly stir in the butter a little at a time. Let mixture boil, stirring occasionally.
  3. When mixture reaches 250 degrees (when you drop a little of it into cold water it forms pliable strands), add the peanuts. Stir constantly for 7-10 more minutes until mixture reaches 300 degrees (when dropped in water it forms brittle strands). Immediately remove from heat, add the vanilla and baking soda, and stir until evenly combined. Pour onto parchment lined baking sheet and spread evenly.
  4. Let cool and set. Use a mallet or back of a spoon to crack the brittle into pieces.
Nutrition Facts
Peanut Brittle
Amount Per Serving
Calories 133 Calories from Fat 72
% Daily Value*
Fat 8g12%
Saturated Fat 5g25%
Cholesterol 20mg7%
Sodium 159mg7%
Carbohydrates 17g6%
Sugar 17g19%
Protein 1g2%
Vitamin A 235IU5%
Calcium 2mg0%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Melanie Dueck

Melanie is the cook and photographer behind the blog Garnish & Glaze. When she’s not playing princesses with her two little girls, she’s experimenting in the kitchen. She takes simple ingredients and creates everything from healthy dinners to indulgent desserts.

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  1. 5 stars
    Can peanut brittle be made with a different type of syrup–like rice, for example–for those with a corn allergy? My dad adores peanut brittle and I’d love to make this for him, but he has developed a corn allergy in his golden years. Bah, humbug! Thanks!

  2. I like the recipe, easy and simple. But I’m having a problem. I can never get it past 260 Degrees before it starts burning. I do live at an elevation of 5200 FT. A mile high. Could this have something to do with it? Should I use lower temperatures? Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks.

    1. HMMM! That may make a difference but it still should not be burning at the rate. I would lower your heat setting a notch and see if that helps. The process may be a lot slower but it may also help with the burning. Hope that helps! XOXO

    2. The temp will not go up until all the water is evaporated. My stove is induction and ranges from 1-10, I cook my brittle on 4 and raise it to 5 once the water is gone, this should be about the 230-250 deg F mark. Also be patient (especially at 5k feet), I am at 1700 ft and when I make mine it takes about 1 hour total from start to finish, go slow. Also if you want your brittle to be more ‘airy” with the air pockets in it just pore it on the cookie sheet and DO NOT spread it or disturb the pan otherwise it will fall. It will be thick but full of yummy air pockets!

  3. I don’t understand why most recipe post I read don’t use CAST IRON to make peanutbrittle. I have a 100 year old wagner I use only for peanutbrittle. It conducts heat better. I was taught not to use a thermometer. Simple reasons, they are at times inaccurate, break, or just get in the way. YouTube’s I see show them being moved all over the pan. Tablespoon and a half of butter is perfect for mine. Putting it in the fridge or freezer does not hurt the candy done it for over 30 years. 150 customers can’t be wrong😉

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