The Best Funeral Potatoes

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This super cheesy, crunchy topped hash brown casserole is truly The Best Funeral Potatoes Ever! The combination of sour cream, onions, garlic and that buttery top all meld together with the potatoes for a side dish perfect for any occasion. Serve this up for your next holiday, or special day and watch the dish disappear. It’s a comfort food classic!

Serve these potatoes with just about anything from Ham, to Chicken to Steak and even Fish! It will go with it all!.

funeral potatoes in a white baking dish with wooden spoon scooping out potatoes.

The Best Funeral Potatoes

Cheesy and beautifully seasoned, these really are just plain amazing! Potatoes are that ultimate comfort food. Combined with onions, sour cream, and lots of cheese, what’s not to love? This has become a staple at the table for many holidays. From Thanksgiving to Easter and everything in between this is a classic side dish that can make any meal complete.

Serve them at potlucks, BBQs as well as holidays. They are not just reserved for special occasions. Double the batch and freeze it (without the topping) to use at another occasion. You loved ones are going to love these potatoes!

Funeral Potato Ingredients

These are so buttery and cheesy!

  • Butter: To saute the onion and garlic with.
  • Onion: Finely chop the onion
  • Garlic: minced
  • Hash Browns: Frozen shredded hash brown potatoes thawed, or make your own
  • Condensed Cream of Chicken Soup: Creates creamy goodness and flavor
  • Sour Cream or Plain Greek Yogurt: More creaminess and a bit of tang
  • Parmesan Cheese Adds a nice punch to the cheese.
  • Salt and Pepper To Taste
  • Sharp Cheddar Cheese: Shredded and firmly packed, don’t skimp on the good stuff.
  • Crushed Corn Flake Cereal or Panko Bread Crumbs: Either one will work

Making Funeral Potatoes

This comes together in a snap.

  1. Saute: In a medium skillet melt 2 Tablespoons of butter. Add the onions and cook till translucent. Add the garlic and saute, just until fragrant.
  2. Mix:  In a large bowl combine the onions, garlic, hash browns, soup, sour cream, parmesan cheese, salt and pepper and 1 ½ cups cheddar cheese. Stir till well.
  3. Pan:  Spread into a 9×13 pan and top with the remaining ½ cup of cheese.
  4. Melt: Melt the remaining 4 Tablespoons of butter and mix with the crushed cornflakes or bread crumbs. Sprinkle on top of the potatoes
  5. Bake: Bake for 50-60 min at 350 degrees till bubbly and cooked throughout.

 

funeral potatoes on a white plate.

Why Are They Called Funeral Potatoes?

  • What’s in a Name: As the name suggests, this cheesy potato comfort food is traditionally served at a meal for the grieving family following a funeral. Most commonly known as Funeral Potatoes in the western and southern United States they are also known as a Cheesy Potato Casserole. They’re popular at gatherings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and are often served at their funerals and other functions.
  • Why Funerals: Besides cheese and potatoes being an ultimate comfort food and just delicious, they are easy to transport, easy to make, and easy to keep warm. Perfect for a potluck and a time of need.
  • The Little Black Dress of Side Dishes: A big helping of cheesy potatoes goes with just about any main dish, making it a very versatile dish. Dress it up or dress it down for the occasion. From Christmas, to birthdays, to funerals, it’s the perfect side attraction. Trust me these will go fast!

     

Tips for The Best Funeral Potatoes

  • Make Ahead: These are one of those wonderful dishes you can make ahead. Make as directed but do not put the cornflake or bread crumb topping on. Refrigerate till ready to bake. Remove from the fridge and let come to room temperature, if you have time. Mix up the topping put on top and cook as directed.
  • Potatoes: Shredded potatoes as well as country style hash browns (cubed potatoes) will work in this recipe. I like the shredded best.
  • Bake Your Own Potatoes:  Make your own hash browns by parboiling 12 small potatoes and grating them once cooled.
  • To Top or Not to Top: You can leave the topping off if you prefer. The crunchy topping does go soggy if you have leftovers. So if you know you will have leftovers you might want to leave it off. Either way it’s still amazing!
  • Leftovers: Store leftovers in the fridge for up to 4 days. They are almost even better the next day!
  • Make it a Meal: Add in diced ham, chicken or bacon and turn this side dish into the main dish!

 

funeral potatoes in a white baking dish.

More Potato Recipes

Potatoes are just plain good!

The Best Funeral Potatoes

5 from 4 votes
A cheesy potato casserole full of melted cheese, sour cream, onions, and garlic with a crunchy top. This is full of amazing flavor and will be the star of the dinner table!
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 5 minutes
Author Alyssa Rivers
Servings: 12 Servings

Ingredients
  

  • 6 Tablespoons butter divided
  • 3/4 cup onion diced
  • 2 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 30 ounce bag of frozen, shredded hash brown potatoes, thawed -or- 12 small potatoes parboiled and shredded
  • 1 10.5 ounce can condensed cream of chicken soup
  • 1 cup sour cream or plain greek yogurt
  • 1/4 cup grated parmesan cheese
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
  • 2 cups sharp cheddar cheese shredded and firmly packed, divided
  • 1 1/2 cup crushed cornflake cereal or panko bread crumbs

Instructions
 

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a medium sized skillet, add 2 Tablespoons butter and sauté until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant. Remove from heat and set aside.
  • In a large bowl, mix together the cooked onions, garlic, hash browns, condensed soup, sour cream, parmesan cheese, salt, pepper, and 1 ½ cups cheddar cheese.
  • Spread into a 9x13 inch baking pan. Top with remaining ½ cup cheddar cheese.
  • Melt the remaining 4 Tablespoons of butter and mix with the crushed cornflake crumbs. Sprinkle evenly over the top of the casserole.
  • Bake for 50-60 minutes or until cooked throughout and bubbly.

Video


Nutrition

Serves: 12

Calories207kcal (10%)Carbohydrates7g (2%)Protein7g (14%)Fat17g (26%)Saturated Fat10g (50%)Cholesterol47mg (16%)Sodium464mg (19%)Potassium75mg (2%)Fiber1g (4%)Sugar2g (2%)Vitamin A501IU (10%)Vitamin C1mg (1%)Calcium199mg (20%)Iron1mg (6%)

All nutritional information is based on third party calculations and is only an estimate. Each recipe and nutritional value will vary depending on the brands you use, measuring methods and portion sizes per household.

Course Side Dish
Cuisine American
Tried this recipe?Mention @alyssa_therecipecritic or tag #therecipecritic

Alyssa Rivers

I am Alyssa and the blogger behind The Recipe Critic. I started my blog in June of 2012 as a place to share my passion for cooking. I love trying new things and testing them out with my family.

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    1. It feeds a lot of people and is a comfort food, so it is most often the potato dish of choice for family luncheons after a funeral. My mom disliked associating them with funerals, so we call them cheesy potatoes at our house.

      1. I felt the same way about the name Chelsey. The potato dish is so delicious, I hated to associate it with sadness, but it does feed a lot of people and is a wonderful comfort food, so I use both names myself.

      1. Not just in Utah. These are nationwide. I have one to funerals in Michigan, California, Washington, Florida, and Vermont, these were served. It’s comfort food, and easy to make.

  1. Wondering if you can make these a day or 2 in advance? I’m thinking that maybe the cornflake mixture would need to be done the day of? Thanks so much for the awesome recipe!

  2. They are called funeral potatoes, because in Utah, where they originated, they are a popular dish to bring to potluck gatherings after a funeral service. 🙂

  3. This was great,It is August and my tomatoes are coming in so I added a layer of thin sliced tomatoes under the topping

  4. I made these for a funeral and had some leftovers, as my 9×13 isn’t quite. I baked the leftovers in a muffin tin and ate them. They were AMAZING.

  5. I made these for my book club, everyone loved them. I went with the panko instead of the cornflakes. Thanks for the recipe!

  6. Hi! I’d like to make this for Easter, so I’m not going have time to test it first. Is this baked uncovered for the entire 50-60 minutes? Just want to make sure I don’t burn the topping. Thanks!

    1. Yes, you can watch them and make sure they do not over bake but that is how long I have had to bake them for them to be done and the cheese to be melted to perfection! The corn flakes help the topping too. Enjoy and Happy Easter!

  7. I’ve had these funeral potatoes but they were made with cream of mushroom and another one was made with cream of celery.Both very delicious. I will definitely try it with cream of chicken soup next time.

  8. 5 stars
    I really question that this recipe originated in Utah. I received it 35 years ago from a friend in Tulsa, OK – she had no Utah connections. She just called it Hash Brown Casserole. Regardless, it’s delicious and works well for any large gathering.

    1. Potato casseroles have been around for hundreds of years. Most of the differences are superficial. “Funeral Potatoes” originate in the Utah/Idaho/Arizona area; the name comes from the Mormons in that region who started using these as a staple at funeral potlucks, but the dish is also called “great potatoes,” “cheesy potatoes,” “hash brown casserole,” “cheesy hash browns,” “those potatoes,” or “party potatoes” in different parts of the United States. These are also similar to “scalloped potatoes” in France.

  9. I decided to go with cream of bacon soup and real bacon pieces throughout and in the topping! Can’t wait to see how it turns out.

  10. 5 stars
    These are the BEST funeral potatoes I’ve ever tasted. I watch people try a little bit of these funeral potatoes and then pretty soon they are back getting a much bigger scoop. I never go home with any left in the pan! Thanks for sharing this recipe, you make me look like a good cook!

  11. 5 stars
    My MIL made these all the time for special events like Thanksgiving and Christmas and Easter, instead of mashed potatoes. Now we make them in honor of her memory. These are always the first thing to go at any event. Instead of hash browns, we use Potatoes O’Brien with diced onions and peppers already in the mix. It makes like so much easier not to have to cut onions and the peppers add an extra dash of yummy to the dish. We all love Cheesy Potatoes at any time of year, but my hubby is happiest of all whenever I made these.

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